Bought my annual pair of jeans.

Shooting super villains outside my apartment.

Shooting super villains outside my apartment.

A Facebook message I recently received.
What.

A Facebook message I recently received.

What.

The Evil Dead - Sam Raimi’s low budget camera rigs

(via yourscreenwriterisabitch)

Happy Easter, Patrick.

Happy Easter, Patrick.

Movies I Watched: Crouching Tiger Hidden Dragon (2000)

For reasons I can’t understand, it’s been almost ten years since I last watched this movie. And it’s one of my FAVORITE movies. Like, I adore it. It basically changed my life when I first saw it in seventh grade.

But I was stupid and kind of forgot about it for years despite owning it on DVD, and was only inspired to watch it when I saw it was streaming on Netflix.

And…it’s perfect. It’s a masterpiece. The ending left me devastated, far moreso than it did when I was younger.

But what stands out the most, and has every time I’ve seen it, is the handful of perfect moments, usually during the fight scenes, that are among the most elegant, thrilling things I can recall seeing onscreen.

We all have our own cinephelic obsessions, and one of my big ones is the cinematic portrayal of movement and speed. I don’t know where it came from, but it’s one of the things I immediately respond to, something that, when executed just right, sends chills through my body. Because of the nature of cinema, the sensation of movement can be communicated greater than through any other medium.

Crouching Tiger does this several times.

 Example: At the end of the very first fight between Shu Lien and the masked Jen Yu, Jen escapes by flying straight back across the courtyard. In one wide shot, her body shoots along the ground, right to left across the frame, then arcing up as she reaches the wall.

One of the great things about Crouching Tiger is the way it jumps from gorgeous, Miyazaki-like stillness to intensely kinetic action. This whole first fight/chase scene is mind-blowing because it arrives out of what seems like a very sedate drama. This moment is a final perfect flourish, a shot of transcendent physical grace and movement (transcendent because, y’know, it’s physically impossible). Through this first action scene we’ve seen the characters make impossible leaps and have short bursts of flight, but nothing as impressive as this. Ang Lee shoots the movement in one wide shot, so we can see from an objective angle the full distance she effortlessly covers, and the moment last just long enough, just an extra half-second beyond what I anticipate, that I unconsciously hold my breath and tense the muscles in my body. It’s a perfect moment that causes me to have an actual physical reaction.

So, yeah, I like this movie a lot. Why does it seem like no one talks about it anymore?

film-vomit:

Man of Steel (2013)

film-vomit:

Man of Steel (2013)

Tattooed Teenage Alien Fighters from Beverly Hills.

This was an actual thing. Why did no one bring this to my attention before now?

This was a real thing that I’m pretty sure I watched some episodes of as a kid.

This is really just so I have a place to talk about crazy YouTube comments.

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